FAQs

What are common Eyelid Problems?

Styes are common eyelid problems and are a type of “boil” involving an eyelash follicle. There is generally a tense swelling with redness and pain, until the abscess escapes. Application of local heat, using a compress can assist in easing the pain and bring the sty more quickly to a “head”. Internal sty, tarsal cyst or chalazion is a chronic granuloma of the Meibomian gland of the eyelid. This manifests as a small hard spherical lump within the eyelid, often easily felt but not seen. Treatment varies, depending on the size and/or associated discomfort which may be caused by the swelling of the eyelid. Other common eyelid problems include blepharitis, which is a kind of “dandruff” of the eyelid margin. The eyelid margins are red-rimmed with flakes and scales among the eyelashes. Burning discomfort and itching comes and goes. Treatment involves cleansing of the eyelid margin, using sterile wipes or eye ointments.

How do I get around dryness with contact lenses?

Try using lubricant eye drops. There can be some dryness if you work in an air-conditioned environment. If the problem persists, consult a professional.

Can I use eyedrops with my contact lenses?

In general eyedrops shouldn’t be used with contact lenses because the lens can absorb the eye drop and result in a concentrated buildup of the solution. There are special, “in-eye” lubricants that many manufacturers/pharmaceutical companies produce for use with contact lenses. Check with your eye care professional if any doubts about the solution.

Can I store my lenses in tap water?

Soft lenses are manufactured from a plastic hydrogel polymer, HydroxyEthylMethacrylate (HEMA) which has varying water content (38% – ~70%). Lens size is between 13.00 and 14.50mm. Centre thickness from ~30um. Hard contact lenses are manufactured from a rigid material, PolyMethylMethacrylate (PMMA). This material can be combined with other plastics to increase the oxygen permeability. Lens size is between 8.0mm and 10.00mm. Centre thickness from ~100um.

What is the difference between soft and hard contact lenses?

An astigmatic eye generally has two different meridians, at 90degrees to each other, which cause images to focus in different planes for each meridian. The meridians can each be myopic, hyperopic or emmetropic. The correction for astigmatism is a lens power at a particular direction of orientation [see section 4.1] Astigmatism causes images to be out of focus no matter what the distance. It is possible for an astigmatic eye to minimize the blur by accommodating, or focusing to bring the “circle of least confusion” onto the retina.

What is Astigmatism?

An astigmatic eye generally has two different meridians, at 90degrees to each other, which cause images to focus in different planes for each meridian. The meridians can each be myopic, hyperopic or emmetropic. The correction for astigmatism is a lens power at a particular direction of orientation [see section 4.1] Astigmatism causes images to be out of focus no matter what the distance. It is possible for an astigmatic eye to minimize the blur by accommodating, or focusing to bring the “circle of least confusion” onto the retina.

Will working at a computer screen hurt my eyes?

No, there is no evidence that working at a computer damages the eyes. However, long hours of work can be fatiguing to the eyes, neck and back. Monitor glare from various light sources can also be a problem. It is often helpful to take periodic breaks, looking off in the distance and adjusting your work station (angle of the monitor, height of the chair, changing the lighting, etc.).

When should an adult eyes be examined?

Adult examinations of the eyes should be performed on a regular basis. Young adults (ages 20 – 39) should have their eyes examined every three-five years. Adults ages (ages 40 – 64) should have their eyes examined every two-four years. Seniors (over 65 years of age) should have their eyes examined every one-two years. High risk adults include: People with diabetes, people with glaucoma or strong family history of glaucoma, and people with AIDS/HIV.

When should my Child’s eyes be examined?

Most physicians test vision as part of a child’s medical examination. They may refer a child to an ophthalmologist (a medical eye doctor) if there is any sign of an eye condition. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend the first vision screening occur in the hospital as part of a newborn baby’s discharge examination. Visual function (including ocular alignment, etc.) also should be checked by the pediatrician or family physician during routine well-child exams (typically at two, four and six months of age). Later amblyopia and alignment screenings should take place at three years of age and then yearly after school age. If you suspect your child suffers from decreased vision – amblyopia (poor vision in an otherwise normal appearing eye), refractive error (nearsightedness or farsightedness) or strabismus (misalignment of the eye in any direction) – or if there are hereditary factors that might predispose your child to eye disease, please make an appointment with an ophthalmologist as soon as possible. New techniques make it possible to test vision in infants and young children. If there is a family history of misaligned eyes, childhood cataracts or a serious eye disease, an ophthalmologist can begin checking your child’s vision at a very early age.

How does the eye work?

When you take a picture, the lens in the front of the camera allows light through and focuses that light on the film that covers the back inside wall of the camera. When the light hits the film, a picture is taken. The eye works in much the same way. The front parts of the eye (the cornea, pupil and lens) are clear and allow light to pass through. The light also passes through the large space in the center of the eye called the vitreous cavity. The vitreous cavity is filled with a clear, jelly-like substance called the vitreous or vitreous gel. The light is focused by the cornea and the lens onto a thin layer of tissue called the retina, which covers the back inside wall of the eye. The retina is like the film in a camera. It is the seeing tissue of the eye. When the focused light hits the retina, a picture is taken. Messages about this picture are sent to the brain through the optic nerve. This is how we see.

What is the difference between an ophthalmologist, an optometrist and an optician?

An Ophthalmologist (MD) has a medical degree and is licensed to practice medicine and perform eye surgery. An ophthalmologist has had at least 12 years of education and training beyond high school and is qualified to diagnose and treat all eye diseases; perform surgery; prescribe and fit glasses and contact lenses. An Optometrist (OD) has a degree in optometry and is licensed to practice optometry. An optometrist has had at least eight years of education and training beyond high school and is qualified to determine the need for glasses and contact lenses; prescribe optical correction; and screen for some eye conditions. An Optician usually has a combination of college (or two years of opticianry school) and on-the-job training. An optician is trained to fit and dispense eyeglasses or contact lenses based upon a prescription from a licensed ophthalmologist or optometrist.

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2490 West Ray Road Chandler, AZ 85224 480.857.3333